Hearing Aid Research Lab

Principal Investigator:
Michael Valente, PhD, Professor, Otolaryngology-Head & Neck Surgery

Overview

The Washington University in St. Louis School of Medicine Hearing Aid Research Laboratory (WUHARL) was established in 1993 by Michael Valente as a means to measure the efficacy (“laboratory”) and effectiveness (“real-world”) of hearing aid technology. The initial primary purpose of WUHARL was to create an environment allowing the Division of Adult Audiology at Washington University in St. Louis School of Medicine to independently evaluate newly introduced hearing aid technologies. This in turn would enhance the services and knowledge of our Audiologists and physicians in providing the best hearing aid healthcare to our patients. In addition, our desire was to share this knowledge with Audiologists and hearing aid manufacturers around the United States and the world via presentations at conferences and submissions of the results of our work to peer and non-peer reviewed journals as well as textbooks or chapters within textbooks.

Research Projects

The Division of Adult Audiology at Washington University in St. Louis School of Medicine is conducting a research study examining different methods of fitting hearing aids and how this could affect the user’s performance. Participants must be 18 years of age or older, have bilateral inner ear hearing loss, no history of middle ear problems (surgery on the ears, hole in the eardrum, etc), and no previous hearing aid use. The study will last about 10 weeks and require four visits. At the end of the study, you will have the option to purchase the hearing aids used in the study for a significantly reduced cost. If you choose not to purchase the hearing aids, you will receive $100 for your participation. If you would like more information please contact Alison Brockmeyer by phone at: 314-362-7516 or by e-mail at: brockmeyeral@wustl.edu.

The Division of Adult Audiology at Washington University in St. Louis School of Medicine is conducting a research study examining different methods of fitting Baha 5 hearing devices.  and how this could affect the user’s performance.  Participants must be 18 years of age or older and be current users of a Baha 5 or Baha 5 Power device.  The study will last about 8 weeks and require three visits. At the end of the study, you will receive $100 for you participation.  If you would like more information please contact Alison Brockmeyer by phone at 314 – 362 – 7516 or by e-mail at brockmeyeral@wustl.edu.

Lab Team

  • Michael Valente, PhD
  • Allison Brockmeyer, AuD
  • Adam Voss, AuD

Publications

  1. Durakovic, N, Valente M, Goebel J, Wick C. What defines asymmetric sensorineural hearing loss? Laryngoscope. 2018 DOI:10.1002/lary.27504
  2. Valente M, Oeding K, Brockmeyer A, Smith S, Kallogjeri D. Differences in word and phoneme in quiet, sentence recognition in noise and subjective outcomes between manufacturer first fit and hearing aids programmed to NAL-NL2. Journal of the American Academy of Audiology 2018 29:706-721.
  3. Ledda K, Valente M, Oeding K, Kallogjeri D. Difference in speech recognition between default and programmed telecoil. Accepted for publication for the Journal of the American Academy of Audiology 2019.
  4. Valente M, Amlani A. Cost as a Barrier for Hearing Aid Adoption. JAMA Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery 2017 E1-E2 Published OnLine May 18, 2017.
  5. Voss A, Oeding K, Bankaitis A, Pumford J, Valente M. Coupler and real-ear performance between PSAPs and hearing aids. Hearing Review 2018:25(11)[Nov]:10-18.
  6. Beck D, ….Valente M, Wolfe J, Audiologic considerations for people with normal hearing sensitivity yet hearing difficulty and/or speech-in-noise problems. Hearing Review 2018 25(10):28-38.
  7. Oeding K, Valente M, Spehar B, Valente M. Evaluation of a Beamforming Television Loudspeaker System. Hearing Review, 2017;24(4):24-28.
  8. Valente M, Oeding K (2015) Evaluation of a BICROS system with a directional microphone in the receiver and transmitter. Journal of the American Academy of Audiology, 26(10):856-871.
  9. Oeding K, Valente M (2015) The effect of a high upper input limiting level on word recognition in noise, sound quality preferences, and subjective ratings of real-world performance. Journal of the American Academy of Audiology, 26(6):547-562.
  10. Oeding K, Valente M (2013) Sentence recognition in noise and perceived benefit of noise reduction on the receiver and transmitter sides of a BICROS hearing aid. J Am Acad Audiol, 24(10):980-991.
  11. Oeding K, Valente M (2013) The effectiveness of the directional microphone in the Oticon Medical Ponto Pro in participants with unilateral sensorineural hearing loss. J Am Acad Audiol, 24(8):701-713.
  12. Oeding K, Valente M (2013) Differences in sensation level between the Widex SoundTracker and two real-ear analyzers. J Am Acad Audiol, 24(8):660-670.
  13. Valente M (2012) Edited Volume 23(4) of the Journal of the American Academy of Audiology on Case Reports from Washington University in St. Louis School of Medicine.
  14. Oeding K, Valente M, Chole R (2012) Challenges in fitting a hearing aid to a severely collapsed ear canal and mixed hearing loss. J Am Acad Audiol, 23(4):276-282.
  15. Putterman D, Valente M (2012) Difference between the default telecoil (t-coil) and the programmed microphone frequency response in behind-the-ear hearing aids. J Am Acad Audiol, 23(5):366-378.

Contact Us

If interested in learning about current research projects, or if you are interested in participating in future research projects contact the Washington University Hearing Aid Research Laboratory by phone at: 314-362-7496 or by e-mail at: brockmeyeral@wustl.edu